Tuesday 19 December 2023

Church photos

  Diane Maskrey sent these photos to St Michael's church.  She says 

"I have been going through some of the photos left by my Grandmother Lilian Josephine Lipscombe Nee Hill. She grew up in 5 Bell Lane Horton with her Father William & her Mother Sarah also known as Jenny.  She loved St Michaels Church." 

Thank you Dianne:

Mothers Union Horton

Horton School netball team


Possibly Rev Thomas Read Davies

St Michaels Church

St Michaels Church Horton

Inside St Michaels Horton

Mother’s  Union banner made for St Michael’s by Miss Ella Foster

In remembrance to Rev Thomas Read Davies

In memory of those of this parish who fell in the Great War 1914-1918

Horton school Choir


5 Bell Lane Horton possibly 1918

Mothers Union pin


Friday 19 May 2023

Horton's War Graves (By Carolyn Wheeler)

 full report is available here: https://wraysbury.com/home/st-michaels-war-graves/




Did you know that St Michaels Church in Horton has 12 war graves?

I have stumbled into being the village archivist, and this along with my role as a church warden has lead me to do some research and to uncover the stories behind some of the graves…



I created the plan below to help people find the graves, it is taken from the entrance into the graveyard extension

Plan showing Extension Churchyard



War Graves – WW1 

  1. William Henry Oxlade, Private 3651, 3/1st Bucks Battalion, Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, who died of wounds on 23 July 1916, aged 18. William was the son of James (Isaac James) Oxlade and his wife Rebecca Springle. This grave has a CWGC headstone. Click here for more.
  2. George Arthur Scott. Private 8150, Bedfordshire Regiment, who died on 9 November 1918. Son of Arthur Edgar Scott, and his wife Mary Ann.  His grave is immediately behind that of his brother Edgar but does not have a CWGC headstone as his parents had already added a curb edge to the grave. Click here for more

In the main churchyard there is a memorial, as part of a family grave, to Percival John Barrott, Stoker First Class, who died on HMS Aboukir when it was sunk by submarine U-9 commanded by Lt. Otto Weddigen when part “Live Bait Squadron” on 22 September 1914. Remembered with honour on the Chatham Naval Memorial Click here for more

Also in the main churchyard, on the headstone of his grandparents’ grave, there is a memorial to Reginald Albert Cosson, Private G/1363 of the 2nd Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment, who died on 25 January 1915 aged 26.  He is also commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial in Pas de Calais, France.  He was the only son of William James and Ellen James Cosson and grandson of George and Emily Barker of Horton.

Civilian War Dead – WW1

  1. Dorothy Moss, aged 16, she was killed in a massive explosion in the Powder Powder Mills in Poyle in April `1915. Her grave is marked with a wooden cross Click here for more



Civilian War Dead – WW2

  1. Robert Henry Floyd. was killed in an air raid in May 1941 at the LCC Weights and Measures Office, Harper Road, Southwark, the floor collapsed and killed all those who were in the basement. Robert was buried in St Michael’s Churchyard on 16th May.
  2. William Isaac Challis. Was killed by the bomb dropped on Park Lane Horton in 1941



Five members of the Brown Family were killed by the same bomb on 3 April 1941 at No.2 Park Lane, Horton.

  1. Mary Elizabeth Brown, aged 47 of 2 Park Lane, Horton, widow of Arthur J W Brown.
  2. Arthur James William Brown, aged 21, Son of the above Mary Elizabeth Brown.
  3. Doris Linda May Brown, aged 19, daughter of the above Mary Elizabeth Brown
  4. Gwendoline Brown, aged 20, daughter of the above Mary Elizabeth Brown.
  5. Alice May Morris (neĆ© Brown) wife of Leonard W Morris and daughter of the above Mary Elizabeth Brown.
  6. Hetty Margaret Golledge, aged 13, daughter of the late James Golledge and his wife Harriet. She was living with Mrs Eleanor Trotman at 1 Park Lane, having been evacuated from Stepney.
  7. William Robert Golledge, aged 6, brother of the above Hetty Golledge



Compiled by Carolyn Wheeler 2023 from various sources

Friday 16 December 2022

Arthur Jacob

I have been researching Arthur Jacob - trying to find out why Arthur Jacob Nature Reserve was given his name.  I haven't yet been able to answer that question but I have found a lot of information about his  life in Windsor (Thank you Carolyn)

Taken from: https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/theroyalwindsorforum/arthur-jacobs-of-jacobs-island-t733.html

 

 - o O o -


Arthur Jacobs (1863 - 1928)

 Arthur Jacobs of Jacobs Island

 


Arthur Jacobs was born in 1863 at the old Anglers Rest, an inn which stood on the site occupied by the Thames Hotel, built around 1906-1907, and of which he was to become proprietor for 22 years. Prior to that he was licensee of the Watermans Arms at Eton. As a boy he attended Eton Porny School and from his earliest days to the close of his life he was either a swimmer or took the greatest of interest in it.

At the age of ten years Arthur Jacobs went to Eastbourne to take part in a high diving competition, an open event in which some of the best divers in the world took part. He won the contest and this was, perhaps the beginning of a wonderful career in the swimming world. Even before this, when he was but eight years old, he assisted in the saving of the lives of two little girls off the Cobbler. His next exploit was to participate in the saving of the lives of two boys at Athens, across the river from Windsor Racecourse, and he also figured in the rescue of a gentleman whose boat had upset.

It was on 7th January 1894, that Arthur Jacobs performed one of the bravest deeds of his life. He gallantly saved a young woman named Elizabeth Burridge who fell into the river when the ice across the Thames to the Brocas gave way. For this act of conspicuous courage, which involved diving under the ice, risking of his own life, he was the recipient of a testimonial from over 200 townspeople who subscribed to the presentation. The gift, which included a cheque for over £21, was made on behalf of the inhabitants by the Mayor of the Borough of Windsor.

On another occasion he saved a Mr Wells and his two daughters when they fell through the ice, and he rescued two girls when he was just eleven years old.

Some years ago a Limehouse man, visiting Windsor, had the misfortune to fall into the river and was in peril of drowning. Arthur Jacobs without hesitation dived into the water and rescued the man. Subsequently there was a remarkable demonstration at Limehouse Town Hall, where Arthur Jacobs's bravery was suitably honoured by a well-earned testimonial.

It is said that if anyone ever got into trouble in the water he would never rest until he got them ashore, without thought to himself. The list of his exploits is too numerous to record, but it is thought that during a lifetime spent by the river he had been instrumental in rescuing over sixty people. He received three certificates from the Royal Humane Society and also the gold, silver and bronze medals for deeds of bravery.

Arthur Jacobs came from a family of established carpenters, his mother Sarah was a daughter of Roger Tolladay, a successful boat builder, who originated from Lambeth, and ran his own company in Eton, building racing boats for Eton College.

It is not surprising with that background that Arthur Jacobs began his passenger boat company. In his capacity as a riverside hotel and boat proprietor he was one of the most popular and familiar figures on the upper reaches of the Thames. Arthur Jacobs was never afraid to advance with the times and the building of the New Windsor Castle, one of the largest and most up to date of up-river steam launches, was a big venture that he undertook in 1923. The steamer was constructed using the latest methods on Jacobs Island, adjoining the promenade. The launching of the vessel created quite a stir in the town at the time, with children being given the day off school to watch. The 'New Windsor Castle' was launched stern first from the slipway which was built facing upstream because the area downstream of the island was used for mooring and letting small craft. Some years ago, David Pickin rediscovered the slipway and restored and recommissioned it. It was in use up to the 1960's.

 

A view downstream from Jacobs Island showing the rowing boats for hire and the earlier promenade beyond

  


An interesting little tale... When Lance Summers, boat builders, arrived to build the Windsor Castle and the Grand Duchess they asked for assistance to carry their anvil onto the island. Clifford Davey the captain of the Empress of India, who was a tremendously strong man, picked up the anvil and put it on his shoulder and walked across to the island. When the boat building had finished Cliff was asked to take the anvil back. His comment was "I carried it over, you take it back!" The anvil was so heavy that two of us had difficulty lifting it so the anvil was left there and the company still has it.

 A double-fronted boat house was first built on the banks beside Corporation Island in Victorian times and it is here that the Windsor Belle was built in 1901 by Edward Burgoine for Arthur Jacobs. Records show that she was built on Corporation Meadow (Clewer Meadow) which was to become Alexandra Gardens and Barry Avenue. Subsequently the boat houses were moved to the island, probably in 1905 when Barry Avenue was constructed.

Circa 1913: The promenade with the rebuilt boathouses beyond on Jacobs Island. In later photographs the boathouses are seen to be striped.

 


 The New Windsor Castle

 


 The New Windsor Castle turns in to Windsor Promenade

The boathouses on Jacob's Island where she was built are beyond.

 


 

The Windsor Belle in 1901

Other boats in the Jacobs fleet were the Woodland Lily, The Duchess and The Welbeck as well as many rowing boats and punts.

 

In addition to his Thames steamer and boat hire business, Arthur Jacobs was chairman of the Windsor Conservative Party and for nine years a member of Windsor Town Council. He died in 1928 at the age of 65. It is fitting that the former Corporation Island has long been known as Jacobs Island, probably since the 1920s and the construction of The Windsor Castle. The name serves to remind us of a famous name from not only Windsor's history but that of the River Thames also.

Wednesday 12 May 2021

Links to info and photos of Berkyn Manor

 

Berkyn Manor (Urban Exploration and Guardian article)

https://www.28dayslater.co.uk/threads/berkyn-manor-horton-berkshire-january-2013.77286/

https://www.theguardian.com/books/booksblog/2015/oct/23/john-milton-berkyn-manor-paradise-abandoned-photographs-former-home

Links to Listed Buildings in Horton

 

Listed Buildings in Horton

LITTLE COURT, BELLS LANE, Horton

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1117642


THE OLD RECTORY, HORTON ROAD, Horton

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1117643


CHURCH OF ST MICHAEL, STANWELL ROAD, Horton

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1117644


THE FIVE BELLS PUBLIC HOUSE, STANWELL ROAD, Horton (now known as THE HORTON ARMS) 

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1117645

The Five Bells Public House, Horton, Windsor and Maidenhead (britishlistedbuildings.co.uk)


HORTON CEDARS, DATCHET ROAD, Horton

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1135929


LYCH GATE TO NORTH OF CHURCH OF ST MICHAEL, STANWELL ROAD, Horton

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1135966


DAIRY OF BERKYN MANOR AT NORTH EAST CORNER OF HOUSE, Off STANWELL ROAD, Horton

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1312996


HORTON LODGE, HORTON ROAD, Horton

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1313011


ASHGOOD FARMHOUSE, STANWELL ROAD, Horton

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1313015


THE CROWN PUBLIC HOUSE AND ATTACHED BARN, THE GREEN, Horton

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1313048


BROOKFIELD, DATCHET ROAD, Horton

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1319361


MILDRIDGE FARMHOUSE, HORTON ROAD, Horton

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1319362


CHURCHYARD WALL, WEST OF CHURCH OF ST MICHAEL, STANWELL ROAD, Horton

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1319363

Links to info on Parish Council and St Michael's Church

 

Parish Council website

http://www.hortonparishcouncil.gov.uk/

 

St Michael's Church (website, history and 3D imagry)

http://www.stmichaels-horton.org/horton/horton-home.php

http://www.stmichaels-horton.org/horton/horton-history-building.php

https://www.behance.net/gallery/12922971/LIDAR-3D-Scanning-St-Michaels-Church-Horton